The Majorelle Creek Top

I thought ‘Creek’ was a funny name for this Majorelle top. When I got to thinking about just how much fashion is created in the world these days, naming every single item of clothing is an exhaustive task.

You see, I’ve been working on a slow fashion project lately with Melbourne couturier Julie Goodwin. Her approach is the antithesis of high street brands who bring fashion to life from sketch to shop floor in six weeks.

Fast fashion has been with us for around 10 years now (arguably longer) and it’s only after 10 years that I feel people are starting to ask questions like ,’Where was this $3 tshirt made?’

Because deep down, I think we all know that a tshirt selling for $3 is not sustainable. I know enough from my own sewing skills that the time it would take to pattern make, cut and sew the garment, costs more than $3. The argument of economy of scale simply doesn’t cut it, and we know this because we have access to information now faster than any time in history. Thank you internet.

Fast fashion isn’t free, someone, somewhere is paying. Lucy Siegle

Clare Press‘s book ‘Wardrobe Crisis: How We Went from Sunday Best to Fast Fashion,’ an extract of which recently appeared in the Australian Financial Review with the headline, ‘Why The Fashion Industry Is Out Of Control,‘ talks in depth about this issue. It’s creeping up the best seller charts because there’s a thirst to talk about a sustainable and responsible approach to how our clothes are made.

I’m going to keep wearing my ‘Creek’ top because the lace is beautiful, it’s well made and I feel like it’s the kind of item that will be in my wardrobe for a long time to come. The name however, well, perhaps I’ll have to come up with something new.
The Majorelle 'Creek' top in white lace

The Majorelle 'Creek' top in white lace

The Majorelle 'Creek' top in white lace

The Majorelle 'Creek' top in white lace

The Majorelle 'Creek' top in white lace